Gordon Bronitsky and Associates, LLC - International Cultural Marketing Since 1992

216 Edith SE
Albuquerque, NM 87102 USA
phone: +1.505.238.3739

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FROM ALL DIRECTIONS

INDIGENOUS AND REGIONAL CULTURES
AND WORLD MARKETS

News from Bronitsky and Associates
Bringing Together Indigenous Peoples and the World Since 1992

Dr Gordon Bronitsky, President, Bronitsky and Associates, 216 Edith SE, Albuquerque, NM 87102, cell 505-238-3739; e-mail

European Office:
Dirk Steitz, Hofackerring 11, 79206 Breisach 3, Germany; Tel: +49 7664-408 972; e-mail


A bi-monthly newsletter from Bronitsky and Associates featuring events and people from Indigenous and Regional cultures in the international scene - festivals, funding, conferences, publications and current issues.

Correspondence, subscription/unsubscription, opportunities, talent news, etc. should be directed to the United States office

Circulation: 6519


Number 106, June 30, 2011

Our News - what's keeping us busy!
The Future
Kenya and the Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Western Australia Indigenous Tourism Operators Conference, Perth, September 2011
Siberian Indigenous Leaders in New Mexico and the Navajo Nation
Gordon Bronitsky in Serbia in May

For Your Diary
Events
Festivals
Funding
Conferences
Publications
Call for Submissions and Papers

News

Sites of Interest

Academic Offerings

Our News - what's keeping us busy!

The Future

Gordon Bronitsky turned 62 in June and after 17 years in the business, he’s finally figured out where he wants to go. Check out his blog at http://www.bronitskyandassociates.com/wordpress/ - maybe you’ll want to join in too!

Kenya and the Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Gordon Bronitsky is currently assisting the Smithsonian’s Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage on development of a possible major new program for the 2014 Smithsonian Folklife Festival (http://www.festival.si.edu) featuring Kenya. The Smithsonian Folklife Festival is one of the largest festivals in the world, usually attracting more than 1 million visitors each year to the National Mall in Washington, DC. This year’s international guest country will be Colombia. Gordon will be in Washington, DC, July 5-12 to meet with the Kenyan delegation and the Director and staff of the Smithsonian’s Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage. Gordon will be blogging his visit to Washington at http://www.bronitskyandassociates.com/wordpress/ so be sure to follow along!

Western Australia Indigenous Tourism Operators Conference, Perth, September 2011

Gordon Bronitsky has been invited to speak at the Western Australia Indigenous Tourism Operators Conference in Perth, September 20-23, 2011. His topic will be “Indigenous Performing Arts, Indigenous Tourism, and Indigenous Economic Development”

Siberian Indigenous Leaders in New Mexico and the Navajo Nation

Several months ago, Gordon Bronitsky was contacted by Pacific Environment, a San-Francisco based environmental nonprofit organization with programs spanning across Northern Pacific and specifically in Russia, China, Alaska, and California. You can find information about their organization on their website http://www.pacificenvironment.org/.

One of their programmatic priorities is conducting annual exchanges and bringing Russian environmental and Indigenous leaders to the US to learn about various issues such as oil and gas development, mining, forestry, dams, indigenous issues and etc. This year Pacific Environment brought a group of 5 indigenous leaders working on indigenous advocacy issues from Kamchatka and Yakutia to North America. The goal of the exchange was to meet with Native American tribal and NGO leaders in New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, and California to learn about their ways of protecting sacred sites and indigenous lands. The exchange will help shape how sacred sites conservation will be replicated in communities across Siberia and the Russian Far East.

The US embassy in Moscow suggested they contact me for possible assistance in arranging meetings, and I did my best, including working with Suzy Baldwin to arrange a meeting with Ben Shelly, the President of the Navajo Nation, and a meeting with Alan Downer, the Director of the Navajo Nation Historic Preservation Department. You can learn more about the delegation and their visit on our blog at http://www.bronitskyandassociates.com/wordpress/.

Gordon Bronitsky in Serbia in May

The Ethnographic Museum in Serbia received funding from the US Speaker Program of the State Department to bring Gordon Bronitsky, President of Bronitsky and Associates, to Belgrade in May.

The goal of his visit was to develop a cooperative agreement for the creation of a Serbian performing arts festival that will

  1. be partnered with the Museum as the host institution from the beginning
  2. train Serbian young people how to run the festival and eventually take it over
  3. introduce Serbian performers to the business of performance through workshops on What is an agent?, What is a contract?, etc and eventually
  4. serve as a performing arts market for venues and booking agents from around the world

Dr. Bronitsky facilitated a two-day workshop on international cultural marketing under the auspices of the Ethnographic Museum. For two days, participants from the performing arts, the culture ministry, venues, producers and more explored marketing the performing arts and the first steps towards developing an annual performing arts festival in Serbia. At the end of the workshop, the participants produced the following statement:

“Having in mind the need to present the richness, diversity and power of performing artists in Serbia, the participants of the two day workshop "International cultural marketing" will work together to create a festival that would represent the best performing arts Serbia has to offer as significant part of its intangible cultural heritage . This festival concept will bring many benefits to Serbia, from socio-cultural to economic and financial. It is an entirely new concept, which has not been seen at existing festivals in our country. The festival will enable visitors and residents of Serbia to experience Serbia's best in one place.”

This is a very exciting development and we will continue to keep you posted.

Dr. Bronitsky also

  • spoke at the 5th Annual Seminar of the Southeast European Experts Network on Intangible Cultural Heritage, which was sponsored by UNESCO (Venice).
  • spoke about the state of applied anthropology in the USA today to the anthropology faculty at the University of Belgrade

Dr. Bronitsky blogged his visit to Serbia, so we hope you followed him along at http://www.bronitskyandassociates.com/wordpress/

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For Your Diary

If you would like to list an event, activity or publication with us, please forward details to  before the 28th of each month to ensure its inclusion in the next FROM ALL DIRECTIONS newsletter.

Events

Prominent Dakota Scholars will Lead Community Chats During “Dakota Music Tour”
STARTING SUNDAY, MAY 22 IN MANKATO, MINNESOTA

SAINT PAUL, Minn., May 13 - Prominent Dakota scholars will lead community chats with audiences at the four venues of “Dakota Music Tour” - a 90-minute musical response to the Dakota-American events of 1862 in Minnesota. “Dakota Music Tour” will feature four concerts that will reach out to Dakota and non-Dakota communities in southern Minnesota.

“Dakota Music Tour” will begin Sunday, May 22 in Mankato, which was the site of the largest mass execution in American history when 38 Dakota men were hung on December 26, 1862.

The Dakota scholars will include: Roger Trudell, chairman, Santee Sioux Nation of Nebraska; Dave Larson, Dakota educator and elder, former tribal chairman of the Lower Sioux Community, tribal historian, and descendant of Chief Wapahasa; and Melvin Houston (Santee Sioux Nation of Nebraska spokesman on Minnesota Indian affairs). Another scholar is yet to be announced.

“The community chats led by these well respected Dakota scholars are designed to explore the intersection of our common humanity and the history of the Dakota and non-Dakota communities,” says composer, flutist and scholar Brent Michael Davids (Mohican).

Each concert will feature traditional American Indian music, Western classical music, music that merges the two together, and community chats. Internationally renowned composer, flutist and scholar Brent Michael Davids, a citizen of the Mohican Nation, has composed the orchestra music, which will be performed by the Mankato Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Music Director and Conductor Kenneth Freed. The production will feature Santee Dakota Maza Kute Drummers, Chickasaw/Choctaw actor and musician Cochise Anderson, and Manny Laureano, who is the principal trumpet of the Minnesota Orchestra. Funding has been provided by the “Arts Tour Minnesota,” a new program of the voter-approved “Clean Water, Land and Legacy Amendment” of the Minnesota Constitution.

The four stops on the concert tour will include: Mankato West High School Auditorium, Mankato (Sunday, May 22, 3 p.m.), community chat led by Trudell; Estebo Performing Arts Center, Redwood Valley High School, Redwood Falls (Saturday, May 28, 1 p.m.), community chat led by a Dakota scholar, TBA; Prairie Edge Casino, Upper Sioux Community, Granite Falls (Sunday, May 29, 1 p.m.), community chat led by Dave Larson; and Winona-Dakota Connection 2011, Unity Park, Winona (Saturday, June 4, noon), community chat led by Houston, Trudell, and Larson.

The Winona concert will be hosted by the Winona-Dakota Unity Alliance (WDUA), a nonprofit organization formed in 2004 with Winona Mayor Jerry Miller, whose mission it is to continue the reconciliation process. Dakota citizens from across North America, including Minnesota, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Canada, will be in attendance.

In addition to the musical production, a documentary video will be produced by Flandreau Santee Dakota filmmaker Syd Beane.

“It is my hope that ‘Dakota Music Tour’ will offer a musical response to the terrible events of 1862 that took so many Dakota and American lives,” says Davids. “By musically honoring the Dakota people and their intersection with the Western world, all citizens can benefit from a deeper understanding of our shared living history.”

Visit Mankato Symphony Orchestra at http://www.mankatosymphony.com. For news, blog postings, and other information about Dakota Music Tour, visit http://dakotamusictour.blogspot.com.

Exhibit: INDIANS - INDIGENOUS PEOPLES OF NORTH AMERICA
Lokschuppen Rosenheim, Germany
8 April - 6 November 2011
Mo-Fr 9 am - 6 pm, Sa, Su, legal holidays 10 am - 6 pm

Until 6 November, the Lokschuppen in Rosenheim, a large exhibition center southeast of Munich, is showing “Indianer - Ureinwohner Nordamerikas” (Indians - Indigenous Peoples of North America).

Curated by Christian Feest, the exhibition uses 550 objects dating from the eighteenth to the twenty-first century from sixteen museums in Austria, Belgium, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Norway, Switzerland, and the Vatican and nearly 200 images to convey a sense of the cultural diversity, historical complexity and ongoing vitality of indigenous peoples in the United States, Canada, and Greenland.

The exhibition is arranged in twelve chapters, which tell very specific stories, but which together are embedded in a framework of the effects of globalization processes of the last 250 years for indigenous peoples. After discussing the European concept of “Indians” as an artifact of the colonial encounter, it looks at the first-contact situation on Vancouver Island, when the ancestors of the present-day Nuuchahnulth were visited by Captain James Cook in 1778. The issue of indigenous lands is examined in a section dealing with the American Revolution, in which the future of Indian lands was to be decided, and when the German mercenaries fighting for King George could see the effects of land loss and cultural adaptation among the peoples living along the St. Lawrence River. Greenland provides an example, in which colonization ultimately led to autonomy, whereas under similar circumstances the peoples of Russian America (Alaska) fared very differently. The western Great Lakes region in the mid-nineteenth century provides a case study for the encounter with Christian missionaries and for the emergence of Indian Christianity. The Sioux and the Apache are shown as contrasting examples for the origins and effects of the “Indian Wars” of the late nineteenth century (with the Comanche looking over the shoulders of the Apache not only as their eternal enemies in Karl May’s novels, but also as the only group of Native Americans who signed a treaty of peace and friendship with German colonists). Hopi katsina religion stands as an example for the complexity indigenous worldviews and ritual practice. A chapter on glass beads illustrates that Western trade goods (and ideas) did not necessarily lead to a leveling of cultural differences and serves as a introduction to the section on indigenous arts and their encounter with the Western art world. The final segment of the exhibition looks at aspects of the contemporary Native American experience.

The exhibition is accompanied by a richly illustrated 270-page book with essays by the curator and Cora Bender, Peter Bolz, Matthias Dietz-Lenssen, Henry Kammler, Sylvia Kasprycki, Christer Lindberg, Sonja Lührmann, Gawan Maringer, Hans-Ulrich Sanner, Tom Svensson, Marthe Thorshaug, and Christine Zackel.

Lokschuppen Rosenheim Location: http://www.kuko.de/main.asp?main=lok&c2=anfahrt&head=ACCESS+AND+LOCATION

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Festivals

The 5th Annual Monument Valley Film, Blues and Arts Festival

The 5th Annual Monument Valley Film, Blues and Arts Festival is making a call for film entries. This year’s film festival will be held in Kayenta, AZ September 9-11, 2011. As usual, there are no submission fees and the entire festival is free to all to attend.

Film submission forms are available on our web site: www.monumentvalleyfilmfest.com

The Monument Valley Film, Blues and Arts Festival is the first and only Native American festival of its kind to be held on the Navajo Nation. The goal of the film festival is to bring Native made films to the people of the Navajo Nation who otherwise would not have the opportunity or means to see these films. It is also an opportunity for emerging and seasoned film makers to present their work to a primarily all Native audience.

The festival is also seeking Native blues groups and artists for the opening night Blues Festival September 9th, 2011. Last year’s Blues festival was a huge success and many people turned out to enjoy the music of Chuckie Begay and the Mother Earth Blues Band, Coalition and the Plateros.

The Monument Valley Film, Blues and Arts Festival is also seeking sponsorship from businesses, organizations and individuals for this year’s film festival. Sponsorship is what keeps this film festival free and going each year. Volunteers are also needed.

Style Pasifika
Auckland, New Zealand
October 18-19, 2011

www.stylepasifika.co.nz

Style Pasifika is recognized as one of New Zealand's iconic must see events and is now in its 17th year of production. It is being held in Auckland between the Rugby World Cup 2011 Semi- final and the Final on Tuesday 18 and Wednesday 19 October Style Pasifika will produce an entertainment spectacular showcasing the best of New Zealand's Pasifika style. It will be uniquely New Zealand appealing to national and international audiences as it highlights this country’s point of difference to the rest of the world as this regions principal pacific nation.

STYLE PASIFIKA - Best of Pasifika NZ is the story of the Maori nation told on an arena event scale using the best lighting, staging, sound and performance. Cultural, traditional and contemporary elements will thread the audience through our journey. Singers, cultural performers, dancers and great New Zealanders past and present will tell their story during a 90 min spectacular.

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Funding

First Peoples Fund Invites Applications for Artist in Business Leadership Program
Deadline: September 1, 2011

The First Peoples Fund's Artist in Business Leadership Program is designed to help entrepreneurial Native American artists develop their marketing and business skills and build self-sustaining, arts-based businesses.

This one-year, self-directed program provides a working capital grant of up to $5,000 to support work on a marketing plan/strategy or business goal as defined by the artist applicant. Additional program benefits include technical assistance, a professional network of peers, and travel expenses to FPF's professional development workshops. The fellowship places emphasis on new works to stimulate creativity and a renewal of energy in Native art expression.

To be eligible, an artist must have five or more years of experience in marketing his or her art at Indian art markets and galleries, and have wholesale experience. Applicants must have chosen art as a means to obtain economic self-sufficiency for themselves and their family, and must have worked to establish themselves as independent, credible artists with viable community-based businesses.

Applicants must be members of a Northern Great Plains tribe located in South Dakota, North Dakota, Montana, Wyoming, Minnesota, Nebraska, the Eastern Plateau region of Idaho, Oregon, or Washington; a tribe from the Great Lakes region of Minnesota, Michigan, or Wisconsin; a tribe belonging to the U.S. Eastern Seaboard states; or a Hawaiian or Alaska Native. Affiliated Canadian First Nations artists are also eligible.
Artists are selected for the program based on demonstrated artistic talent, evidence of entrepreneurial experience and potential, and adherence to the values of the First Peoples Fund.

For complete program information and application procedures, visit the FPF Web site: http://www.firstpeoplesfund.org

For more information and to download an application, visit http://www.firstpeoplesfund.org/artists_artist_in_business_leadership.html

National Endowment for the Arts Announces New Arts in Media Funding Category
Deadline: September 1, 2011

The National Endowment for the Arts' new Arts in Media funding category is designed to help make the excellence and diversity of the arts widely available to the American public through the national distribution of innovative media projects about the arts and media projects that can be considered works of art.

The new Arts in Media guidelines replace the Arts on Radio and Television guidelines. All project types that were previously eligible under Arts on Radio and Television remain eligible. In addition, the expanded category now includes all available media platforms, including the Internet, interactive and mobile technologies, digital games, and arts content delivered via satellite, as well as radio and television.

Grants are available to support the development, production, and national distribution of innovative media projects about the arts (e.g., visual arts, music, dance, literature, design, theater, musical theater, opera, folk and traditional arts, and media arts including film, audio, animation, and digital art) and media projects that can be considered works of art.

Projects may include high profile multi-part or single television and radio programs (documentaries and dramatic narratives), media created for theatrical release, performance programs, artistic segments for use within an existing series, multi-part webisodes, installations, and interactive games. Short films, five minutes and under, will be considered in packages of three or more.

The new program guidelines feature an emphasis on innovation as well as strengthening creativity through access to the arts. In order to reach the widest possible audience, priority will be given to projects that include substantive public engagement strategies, including the use of social media.

To be eligible, applicants must be U.S.-based nonprofit 501(c)(3) organizations, units of state or local government, or federally recognized tribal communities or tribes. Applications through a fiscal agent are not allowed; however, partnerships between artists and eligible nonprofit organizations are encouraged. Any application for a collaborative project representing a partnership between a media organization and an arts, education, or community organization should be submitted by the media organization.

Grants generally will range from $10,000 to $200,000, based on the platform and the complexity and scope of the project.

Visit the NEA Web site for complete program guidelines, a short video on the new program, and application instructions at http://www.nea.gov/grants/apply/AIM-presentation.html.

The Australia Council for the Arts welcomes the budget announcement of $10 million in new funding for artists.

The initiative will support artists across all artforms to deliver new artistic works, undertake fellowships and create additional presentations to Australian audiences over the next five years as part of the Government’s commitment to invest in a creative Australia. “The Australia Council has long been committed to increasing funds for artists and their work,” says Kathy Keele, CEO of the Australia Council. “So we’re pleased to see this investment in these three key grant areas, which will not only support artists to create new work, but will ultimately give Australian audiences access to new and diverse creative experiences.” Through the initiative, grants of up to $80,000 will be available for new work and up to $50,000 for additional presentations to Australian audiences. It also provides for fellowships for Australia’s young and emerging and mid career artists.
http://www.australiacouncil.gov.au/news/items/2011/new_investment_in_australian_artists

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Conferences

Immersion A-Z: Essential Basics for Language Immersion Programs
Consortium of Indigenous Language Organizations (CILO)
Language Immersion for Native Children Program (LINC)
July 18 through July 20, 2011

Three-day workshop for those planning and starting immersion programs
Venue: Indian Pueblo Cultural Center, Albuquerque, NM

The CILO Immersion A-Z Workshop in Tucson, AZ on June 29-July 1, 2011 is filled to capacity.

Please be advised we have great news! We have added another CILO Immersion A-Z Workshop on July 18-20, 2011 to be held at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Seating will be limited so sign up quickly. Registration deadline is June 30, 2011 unless this workshop fills up prior to that date. For those of you who applied but could not get into our Tucson workshop, you have been placed a waiting list and the waiting list will be given first priority for Albuquerque.

This workshop provides an overview of diverse essential elements that are required for successful planning and implementation of immersion programs. The workshop provides hands-on experience on language immersion methods, the proven effective way of transmitting language knowledge from one generation to the next in a variety of contexts:

  • At home (Family Language Program)
  • In the community where an elder works with a learner (Master-Apprentice Program)
  • At Day Care Centers where babies are cared for
  • At Preschool/Head Start where very young toddlers interact with each other and with caregivers
  • At schools where young children are formally educated to be active and contributing members of the community and of the world

Participants will learn how to design and implement immersion teaching, how to make long range plans for language programs, how to create language activities, how to produce fun and useful materials for language learning, and how to assess the effectiveness of the language immersion program.

Registration form: http://www.ilinative.org/cilo/CILOFlyerImmersionwithhotelinfoinABQ.pdf
Tentative Schedule: http://www.ilinative.org/cilo/CILOImmersionGeneralSchedule.pdf

17th International Conference of the ACEI
Association for Cultural Economics International Kyoto, Japan 21 June 2012 to 24 June 2012
http://yagi.doshisha.ac.jp/aceikyoto/index.htm

The Association for Cultural Economics International (ACEI) invites you to attend its 17th international conference on cultural economics to be held at Doshisha University, Kyoto, from Thursday June 21st to Sunday 24th, 2012.

Soundtracks: Music, Tourism and Travel
Liverpool, United Kingdom
6-9 July 2012

As an expression of culture, a form of intangible heritage, a signifier of place, and a marker of moments, music provides an important and emotive narrative for tourists. Indeed, it is increasingly difficult to imagine tourism ‘in silence’, outside of the scores and songs which accompany and punctuate journeys. From touristic performances of traditional dance, pilgrimages to the homes and graves of composers and singers, impromptu street entertainments, tours to concerts, attending festivals, to the sounds of the car radio, the travelling with iPods and the ‘muzak’ of hotel lifts, music can both activate and shape the journey, and passively permeate its duration. Music can both define and transcend the borders of destinations, emphasise and challenge notions of tradition, provide opportunities for liminal play, transgression and resistance and, help define the identities of visitors and the visited.

CALL FOR PAPERS
In this, the CTCC’s 6th international research conference, and in the City of Liverpool famed for its popular music, we seek to explore the relationships between tourism, tourists and all forms/genres and sub-genres of music including: popular, classical, folk, dance, rock, jazz and hip-hop, across all cultures and continents. In the context of new and old global mobilities, we are interested in musical pilgrimage, the material and social flows of travellers and musicians, the cultural and economic policies that promote music tourism, festivals and performances for tourists, ethnographies of touristic encounters with music, the place of music in the representation of tourism destinations and, the role of music in the construction of tourist discourses, narratives and memories. As in previous events, the conference aims to provide critical dialogue beyond disciplinary boundaries and epistemologies and thus we welcome papers from the widest range of disciplines and fields including: anthropology, cultural geography, cultural studies, ethnology and folklore, history, heritage studies, landscape studies, leisure studies, museum studies, musicology and ethnomusicology, philosophy, political sciences, sociology, subaltern studies, tourism studies and urban/spatial planning.

We welcome innovative perspectives on all aspects of music and tourism. Key themes of interest to the conference include:

  • Musical memory - the role of music in narratives of touristic experience
  • Fans, pilgrimage and performances - motivations, behaviours and meanings
  • The tourist’s involvement in preserving and creating musical traditions
  • Managing tourists at musical sites
  • Musical imaginaries - representing places, peoples and pasts in music
  • Dance tourism and embodied practices
  • Designing ambience - mobilising music in touristic spaces
  • Music festivals as opportunities for tourist encounters
  • Inspirations - travelling musicians
  • Music as intangible heritage - touring through traditions
  • Challenging musical traditions - tourist ‘noise’

Please submit a 300 word abstract including title and full contact details as an electronic file to . You may submit your abstract as soon as possible but no later than November 21st 2011.

For further details on the conference please contact us at Email or Tel. +44 (0) 113 812 8541.

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Publications

Pieter Hovens, American Indian Material Culture: The Ten Kate Collection, 1882-1888
With contributions by Duane Anderson, Ted Brasser, Laura van Broekhoven, Alan Ferg, Ruth B. Phillips, Marian E. Rodee, and David R. Wilcox

ERNAS Monographs 4
vi+282 pp, 364 color and 31 b/w and sepia illustrations,
bibliographies, index
ISBN 978-3-9811620-1-1
Altenstadt 2010: ZKF Publishers
Euro 29,90

In the course of two years of fieldwork in the American West in the 1880s, the Dutch anthropologist Hermann ten Kate (1858-1931) assembled a sizeable collection of Native American artifacts. These pieces, ranging from utilitarian tools to genuine works of art, are especially important because of their well-documented collection history and early date of acquisition. Some of the objects, the vast majority of which are today housed by the National Museum of Ethnology in Leiden, represent the oldest specimens of their kind to have been preserved. This catalogue presents the complete collection and places the artifacts in their cultural and historical context by drawing on Ten Kate’s own travel diaries, anthropological studies spanning more than a century of research, as well as Native American oral traditions.

Pieter Hovens is curator of the North American Department at the National Museum of Ethnology in Leiden, the Netherlands. His publications include studies on Ten Kate’s life and work, Native American material culture, Indian-White relations, and gypsy affairs.

Order from ZKF Publishers, Fasanenweg 4a, D-63674 Altenstadt, , Fax: +49 6047 951785 (Visa, MasterCard, and American Express accepted)

The Top 10 Reasons to Support the Arts (from Arts Watch)
Arts Watch
http://blog.artsusa.org/2011/04/20/the-top-10-reasons-to-support-the-arts/

Advanced Readings in Business Anthropology
edited by Robert Guang Tian, Daming Zhou, Alfons Van Marrewijk
North American Business Press--Toronto, Miami, Seattle 2011
http://www.na-businesspress.com

Chapter 14 Creating Spaces Where Things Happen: The Life Story of a Business
Anthropologist
Gordon Bronitsky

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Call for Submissions and Papers

Media and Media Practices in Minority and Competitive Contexts: From Local to Global
Call for Proposals Edmonton, Canada, 11-12 May 2012

The University of Alberta is organizing a conference on Media and Media Practices in Minority and Competitive Contexts: From Local to Global, to be held on 11-12 May 2012. Few studies have been conducted on the topic of media in minority context, however, in today's plurilingual and multicultural societies, their role in the functioning of democracy and in the construction of minorities' cultural identities is crucial. These media are both channels of communication and gathering places or common areas for communities. By connecting individuals who share the same language, these media reinforce solidarity within minority groups as well as their cultural identity, both at the local and global levels. In order to maintain their existence, minority media must also position themselves vis-à-vis the media of the majority to which their audiences also have access.

Conceived as a space for exchange between practitioners and researchers in social sciences, humanities and modern languages, this colloquium seeks to reflect on the role of media in minority contexts from various perspectives and with a comparative angle.

The selection committee invites media professionals to participate and submit proposals on any question related to the issue of media in minority contexts, particularly cultural representations (identity, art, translation), democracy (multiculturalism, ethics, media status), networks (national, transnational), professional practice (journalism, technology), language policy and language use. Submissions of proposals dealing with different media: television, radio, specialized and general press, posters, Internet, etc. are encouraged. The deadline for the submission of abstracts is 1 September 2011.

For more information, please contact or see http://confmedia.jimdo.com

Soundtracks: Music, Tourism and Travel
Liverpool, United Kingdom
6-9 July 2012

As an expression of culture, a form of intangible heritage, a signifier of place, and a marker of moments, music provides an important and emotive narrative for tourists. Indeed, it is increasingly difficult to imagine tourism ‘in silence’, outside of the scores and songs which accompany and punctuate journeys. From touristic performances of traditional dance, pilgrimages to the homes and graves of composers and singers, impromptu street entertainments, tours to concerts, attending festivals, to the sounds of the car radio, the travelling with iPods and the ‘muzak’ of hotel lifts, music can both activate and shape the journey, and passively permeate its duration. Music can both define and transcend the borders of destinations, emphasise and challenge notions of tradition, provide opportunities for liminal play, transgression and resistance and, help define the identities of visitors and the visited.

CALL FOR PAPERS
In this, the CTCC’s 6th international research conference, and in the City of Liverpool famed for its popular music, we seek to explore the relationships between tourism, tourists and all forms/genres and sub-genres of music including: popular, classical, folk, dance, rock, jazz and hip-hop, across all cultures and continents. In the context of new and old global mobilities, we are interested in musical pilgrimage, the material and social flows of travellers and musicians, the cultural and economic policies that promote music tourism, festivals and performances for tourists, ethnographies of touristic encounters with music, the place of music in the representation of tourism destinations and, the role of music in the construction of tourist discourses, narratives and memories. As in previous events, the conference aims to provide critical dialogue beyond disciplinary boundaries and epistemologies and thus we welcome papers from the widest range of disciplines and fields including: anthropology, cultural geography, cultural studies, ethnology and folklore, history, heritage studies, landscape studies, leisure studies, museum studies, musicology and ethnomusicology, philosophy, political sciences, sociology, subaltern studies, tourism studies and urban/spatial planning.

We welcome innovative perspectives on all aspects of music and tourism. Key themes of interest to the conference include:

  • Musical memory - the role of music in narratives of touristic experience
  • Fans, pilgrimage and performances - motivations, behaviours and meanings
  • The tourist’s involvement in preserving and creating musical traditions
  • Managing tourists at musical sites
  • Musical imaginaries - representing places, peoples and pasts in music
  • Dance tourism and embodied practices
  • Designing ambience - mobilising music in touristic spaces
  • Music festivals as opportunities for tourist encounters
  • Inspirations - travelling musicians
  • Music as intangible heritage - touring through traditions
  • Challenging musical traditions - tourist ‘noise’

Please submit a 300 word abstract including title and full contact details as an electronic file to . You may submit your abstract as soon as possible but no later than November 21st 2011.

For further details on the conference please contact us at Email or Tel. +44 (0) 113 812 8541.

2012 American Indian Workshop in Zurich
Problems inherent in the very act of representation become salient in minority/majority multicultural situations. Being inherent in the act, they are not resolved in the course of (inter)cultural interaction, they are merely reshaped and reformulated. They arise with particular clarity in cultural places that function as loci of cultural canon formation, such as museums. Questions of ownership, authorization and authentication have consistently been raised with regard to them during the last few decades. I.e., issues that pervade the discussion of intercultural representation have been asked with regard to museums so as to give them a paradigmatic place in the wider discussion.

The conference will take stock of the current state of the discussion both in the discipline(s) of Indigenous Studies and in the narrower field of museology. It will attempt to play explicit and continuous attention to the fact that cultural, economic, political, etc. interactions with “Ame­rican Indians” in the US and “First Nations” in Canada have been shaped differently. These differences have become of great interest to North American Native Studies, which have thereby acquired a pronounced and fruitful comparative bent.

In Zurich, conference participants will particularly discuss new insights and new develop­ments in various loci, where the questions of presentation and representation become salient:

  • Media such as film, video, the fine arts, literature, other forms of popular culture, and the like.
  • Places such as museums (where representation becomes visible as presentation in ways that demand constant reflection and vigilance), theatres, the lecture hall.
  • Disciplines related to Native issues such as anthropology, art history, history, literature, cultural studies, law, economics, and the like.

Proposals for contributions (abstracts of no more than 250 words) are invited by October 31st to the following e-mail address (). Information on a special homepage for the 2012 meeting will be announced by the end of June.

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News

Leading Aboriginal Photographer Wayne Quilliam Appointed as Adjunct Professor at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Australia
“With title comes responsibility and receiving this honour is an affirmation of cultural recognition. I am excited to be aligned with RMIT and look forward to developing succinct and realistic discussions relating to Indigenous perspectives in Art, Photography and Design.”

“Twenty five years of working in rural, remote and urban Indigenous communities in Australia and overseas has given me a unique perspective regarding the visualisation of our people. Fortunately, an earlier decision to remain impartial and politically neutral allows me the freedom to be a conduit between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians”.

“This appointment will allow practitioners and academics together with students to gain an understanding into the intricate workings of Indigenous communities throughout Australia and the cultural similarities of Indigenous people and practices across the globe. My methodology will allow people to explore similarities and differences on their own and encourage divergent thinking.”

Seeing similarities and differences is a fundamental cognitive process, the visual arts in particular photography assists learners in connecting with our culture through the power of digital imaging. He says he wants to bring a new perspective to the education system, one which is current and challenges people to ask themselves “What do I really know and will this information assist me to explore new ideas?, this concept fosters relationships and connections to a new level of understanding regardless of preconceived ideas.

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Sites of Interest

For more information please contact: .

Navajo Language Academy
The Navajo Language Academy, Inc. is a non-profit educational organization devoted to the scientific study and promotion of the Navajo language. The NLA is a joint effort by professional language teachers and linguists. The NLA has hosted Navajo linguistics workshops for scholars every summer since 1997
http://www.swarthmore.edu/SocSci/tfernal1/nla/nla.htm

Maori Language
http://www.maorilanguage.net

The Role of the Computer in Learning Ndj Bbana (an Aboriginal Australian language)
http://llt.msu.edu/vol6num2/pdf/auld.pdf

Kanien’kehá:ka Onkwawén:na Raotitióhkwa Language and Cultural Center
Established in 1978, the Kanien’kehá:ka Onkwawén:na Raotitióhkwa Language and Cultural Center was created to preserve and enrich the language and culture of the Kanien’kehá:ka (Mohawk) of Kahnawà:ke. Our center is located in the Mohawk Territory of Kahnawà:ke south of Montreal, Canada.
http://www.korkahnawake.org

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Academic Offerings

MA programme in Cultural Policy and Management
Interculturalism and Mediation in the Balkans

The University of Arts in Belgrade, Serbia, in cooperation with the University Lyon 2, France is organizing a joint MA programme in Cultural Policy and Management (Interculturalism and Mediation in the Balkans). This MA programme, taught in English and French, has gained an international reputation. Accredited by the University Lyon 2 and supported by other partner universities, professional organizations and guest experts from all over Europe, it attracts not only students from the Balkan region but also those coming from Europe and worldwide, who seek a new, stimulating and different study environment.

This programme enables students to be part of a creative capital and multicultural landscape of the Balkans. For its excellence in the promotion of intercultural cooperation and mediating capacities of culture, the MA in Cultural Policy and Management has been named UNESCO Chair in 2004.

The programme is implemented through lectures, project making, research based learning, problem solving, small group work, individual and group tutorials, internships in France and Balkan countries, seminars and workshops designed to help the student develop wider contextual understanding, research skills and awareness of professional issues.

Interested candidates are invited to apply by 13-15 June 2011 and 19-20 September 2011 respectively.

For more information, please visit www.arts.bg.ac.rs/rektoraten/stud/?id=infobuduci

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